Archive for May, 2012


Could someone please explain to the Bloomin’(berg) idiot the difference between mommies, nannies, Queens, and Mayors?

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg outlined a plan Wednesday to ban the sale of sugary soft drinks larger than 16 ounces at restaurants, movie theaters, street carts and other venues.

Reason.tv’s Anthony Fisher took to the streets to ask New Yorkers what they thought about Bloomberg and the ban.

Here are just a few reasons why states should refuse to create ObamaCare Exchanges.

Jobs. Refusing to create an exchange will block Obamacare from imposing a tax on employers whose health benefits do not meet the federal government’s definition of “essential” coverage. That tax can run as high as $3,000 per employee. A state that refuses to create an exchange will spare its employers from that tax, and will therefore enable them to create more jobs.

Religious freedom. In blocking that employer tax, state officials would likewise block Obamacare’s effort to force religious employers to provide coverage for services they find immoral — like contraception, pharmaceutical abortions, and sterilization.

The federal debt. Refusing to create exchanges would also reduce the federal debt, because it would prevent the Obama administration from doling out billions of dollars in subsidies to private insurance companies.

The U.S. Constitution. The Obama administration has indicated that it might try to tax employers and hand out those subsidies anyway — even in states that don’t create an exchange, and even though neither Obamacare nor any other federal law gives it the power to do so. If that happens, the fact that a state has refused to create an exchange would give every large employer in the state — including the state government itself — the ability to go to court to block the administration’s attempt to usurp Congress’s legislative powers.

A lower state tax burden. States that opt to create an exchange can expect to pay anywhere from $10 million to $100 million per year to run it. But if states refuse, Obamacare says the federal government must pay to create one. Why should states pay for something that the federal government is giving away?

Bye-bye, Obamacare. That is, if the feds can create an exchange at all. The Obama administration has admitted it doesn’t have the money — and good luck getting any such funding through the GOP-controlled House. Moreover, without state-run exchanges, the feds can’t subsidize private insurance companies. That by itself could cause Obamacare to collapse.

Michael F. Cannon is the director of Health Policy Studies at the Cato Institute. Video Produced by Caleb O. Brown and Austin Bragg.

In the northernmost reaches of California’s Ventura County, a two-lane rural road called Highway 33 runs into the rugged and mostly undeveloped Transverse Mountain Range. Though it’s mostly raw wilderness, a few businesses catering to adventurous explorers have long existed there, some for more than a century.

But now the local government is shutting those businesses down, one by one, using arcane zoning and building-code laws to get the job done.

“If there isn’t someone complaining, and there isn’t really a serious public health and safety issue, why do they spend so much of their time pursuing these kinds of cases?” asks Lynne Jensen, executive director of the Ventura County Coalition of Labor and Business (COLAB).

Tom Wolf owns the Pine Mountain Inn, a restaurant that’s been serving biker groups and local community organizations since the 1930s. Wolf temporarily had to shut the doors when he suffered a heart attack in 2002, and he was never able to reopen when the county informed him that his property had been rezoned as an “Open Space” back in the 1980s without his knowledge.

“[The county] wanted everybody out of here,” says Wolf. “And they wanted a complete open space with nothing but deer and frogs… and no people.”

No matter how hard Wolf tried to comply with the ever-changing codes, the county just wouldn’t relent, at one time even ordering him to remove a chicken coop that had never actually existed on the property.

Wolf isn’t alone, says Jensen. Several other small businesses along Highway 33 have been hit by multiple county agencies for no apparent reason.

“They had every department hit us with violations to make sure that they shut us down,” says April Hope, who, along with her husband Bob, owns a bed and breakfast called The Wheel, which has existed in the area since the 1890s.

Since the Hopes purchased The Wheel in early 2000, they’ve never been able to open it to the public. While officials from the county supervisor’s office and the planning department refused to speak with ReasonTV for this story, Jensen says that the county is using code enforcement to drive these businesses off the land without compensation.

“This rezoning is really a way to get around eminent domain, because eminent domain means you give up your entire property. And here, you only give up part of your rights,” says Jensen.

Invoking eminent domain to seize private property would not only require the county to compensate landowners, but also to demonstrate that the taking served a “public use.”

“They have been very successful in taking people’s property in a number of different ways without compensation as long as they don’t take ownership of it,” says Jensen.

Istria Cafe is a small business in Chicago, one of the most over-regulated cities in America. PJTV’s Alexis Garcia interviews the Pribaz brothers, the owners of Istria Cafe, to show you how regulations are destroying businesses and jobs. Would you believe that it is almost impossible to run a business in Chicago without violating rules and regulations, and paying extraordinary fines? From utilities, to health care Alexis Garcia tells you why some businesses might not survive in the down economy.

With the 2012 elections before us, we’ve seen much speculation about whether the Tea Party will repeat the crucial role it played in the 2010 elections. Focusing on three principles—limited government, unapologetic U.S. sovereignty, and constitutional originalism—Elizabeth Price Foley’s new book addresses that question, and more, head on. As George Will put it, “at last, someone conversant with the large issues now roiling contemporary American politics has taken the Tea Party seriously and concluded that it is intellectually substantial and politically constructive.”

Bill Whittle weaves together monetary policy, aeronautics, and the European Union on this edition of Afterburner. Whittle thinks the Euro is heading for catastrophic failure, just like the tragic Airbus A330 that crashed into the Atlantic. How does this affect you? Find out.

The sad history of state-sponsored ethnic cleansing in North America begins with the story of the British expulsion of the Acadians in 1755. Professor Amy Sturgis explains that the Acadians were peaceful French colonists who had prospered in Nova Scotia. The British forcibly removed the Acadians from their homes and scattered them across North America. The expulsion effectively ended the Acadian way of life forever. How might U.S. history have been different if this first ethnic cleansing had never occurred? How might America be different today if the Acadians’ property and rights had been respected? Might the Acadian way of life have influenced the United States for the better?

“Many libertarian men are fairly ignorant about women’s issues. Some of them are outright hostile to feminism because they’ve never bothered to find out what it is,” says Sharon Presley, Ph.D.

Greeks are pulling their money out of banks at the same time that some of its politicians are threatening to leave the euro. Is the eurozone falling to pieces? Will the European debt crisis spread to the US? Find out as the Allen Barton talks to Terry Jones of IBD, and Yaron Brook of the Ayn Rand Institute.

Doctor turned congresscritter discusses healthcare at Hillsdale College.