Archive for the ‘capitalism’ Category

John Allison is the President and CEO of the Cato Institute. Prior to joining Cato, Allison was Chairman and CEO of BB&T Corporation, the 10th largest financial services holding company headquartered in the United States. During his tenure as CEO from 1989 to 2008, BB&T grew from $4.5 billion to $152 billion in assets. He was recognized by the Harvard Business Review as one of the top 100 most successful CEOs in the world over the last decade.

Allison has received the Corning Award for Distinguished Leadership, been inducted into the North Carolina Business Hall of Fame, and received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Banker. He is a former Distinguished Professor of Practice at Wake Forest University School of Business, and serves on the Board of Visitors at the business schools at Wake Forest, Duke, and UNC-Chapel Hill.

Allison is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He received his master’s degree in management from Duke University, and is also a graduate of the Stonier Graduate School of Banking.

via John A. Allison discusses Peter Wallison's Book "Bad History, Worse Policy" on C-SPAN 2's Book TV – YouTube.

Prager University: Do High Taxes Raise More Money? – YouTube.

Possibly the best short explanation of the Laffer Curve I’ve seen. Of course there is more to be discussed because this example focuses on the morally reprehensible “progressive” tax system wherein 47% of filers wither pay no income taxes or receive a cash bonus for filing. However, we’ll save that for another time.

Tim Groseclose, in addition to being a faculty member at Prager University, is a professor of political science and economics at UCLA. His article on this subject is here.

The Laffer Curve and New Evidence that Taxes Stifle Economic Output

Here is the link to download the Romer & Romer paper (in pdf) from the UC Berkeley website:

The Macroeconomic Effects of Tax Changes: Estimates Based on a New Measure of Fiscal Shocks

Douglas Rasmussen is a professor of philosophy at St. John’s University. In this lecture given at an International Society for Individual Liberty conference in 1991, he introduces subjective value to the general concept of human flourishing. He references F.A. Hayek’s article “The Use of Knowledge in Society” to make the argument that a familiarity with and respect for concrete particular knowledge is necessary not only for market economies to emerge but is also important when applied to the human matrix of decision-making for leading a moral and fulfilled life. Basically, each individual and each individual alone has the particularized local knowledge to make the determinations about which proportions of competing value classes will lead to fulfillment in their lives; thus there is no ‘one size fits all’ standard of happiness that can be provided by prescriptive institutions.

Zo brings you footage of a woman who is upset that she has to work in order to pay her bills. Zo reminds this anti-capitalist liberal that there is no such thing as a free car, or house, or health care.

Bill Whittle has his truth. Pacifica Radio’s Amy Goodman has her truth. Everyone has their own truth. This is the mantra of the left today, and if you think about it, it has to be the mantra of the left.