Archive for the ‘economics’ Category

Trying to write off that red wedding this year? As tax day approaches April 15, 2014, nobody’s more upset about paying their debts than those playing the Game of Thrones. One thing is for sure: All men must pay. For more on taxes, check out articles at Reason.com.

via Tax Day is Coming: Game of Thrones Edition – YouTube.

The US Income tax code has over 70,000 pages, the IRS has proven itself to be a politically driven weapon utilized by political hacks and manned by goonion members whose one ambition is arguably to expand their influence over the lives of its “subjects” while milking the public in order to provide for the bloated, oppressive agency modeled of “The Sheriff of Nottingham”. (The “truth” about Robin Hood is that he stole from tax receipients toreturn to the taxed)

Here is an add that inadvertently presents an excellent case for The Fair Tax,

We see the results of our oikophobic chief executive’s “shared dream” as Hollande has France circling the drain. Of course it may be the point, after all you need almost (if not total) dictatorial power in order to force people to submit in order to survive. N’est ce pas?

From RT, the Russian 24/7 English Language News Channel (They know a thing or two about collectivism)

As if the French President didn’t have enough on his mind this week over his alleged affair with an actress. There are domestic problems of a more official nature he’s got to answer for, if he’s to keep his new year’s resolution to revive the country’s debt-heavy, sluggish economy.

via Too Little Too Late? Hollande U-turns as France pays heavy price for sky-high taxes – YouTube.

Performed at the CMA Awards 11/06/2013

▶ Brad Paisley and Carrie Underwood Perform Obamacare by Morning – YouTube.

From Damian Paletta at the Wall Street Journal

The Social Security Administration has begun warning the public it cannot guarantee full benefit payments if the debt ceiling isn’t increased.

When asked by the public, the agency is notifying beneficiaries that “Unlike a federal shutdown which has no impact on the payment of Social Security benefits, failure to raise the debt ceiling puts Social Security benefits at risk,” according to a person familiar with the agency directive.

The warning was assembled after the agency consulted with the Treasury Department, which would play a lead role in determining how the government handles payments if the borrowing limit isn’t raised soon.

“Our employees started receiving questions from the public, so the agency worked with Treasury to provide an answer they could use when asked about the debt ceiling by the public,” a Social Security Administration spokesman said.

In 1937 the Roosevelt administration had to defend the Social Security Act and did so by stating before the Supreme Court that the inanely named FICA was simply a tax with no contract of benefits accruing to the payers and thus legal under government’s taxing authority. Sounds ;ike Justice Roberts” reasoning in the Obamacare fiasco, doesn’t it? The 1937 case was .

Obama is trying to fulfill the Cloward-Piven Stategy which is actually a blueprint for despotic communism. The idea of a equal living income for everone has a major flaw, who pays?

Markets are much more than multinational corporations, banking firms, and stock brokerages on Wall Street, though all of those things are the result of a market system.Sound economies, from the biggest multinational banks to a childs sidewalk lemonade stand, operate on the principles of private property and exchange. These concepts are the building blocks of free societies, and it is the system of countless small trades, taken as a whole, that we call “the market.”It is important to note that these trades are positive sum win-win situations: each party agrees to a trade because they value what theyre getting more than what theyre giving up.And when those trades are voluntary–when nothing is preventing people from making trades or forcing people to make trades–that results in a free market, which makes everyone healthier, wealthier, more peaceful, and more technologically advanced.Thats what libertarians mean when they defend the free market.

via What Libertarians Mean By The Free Market – YouTube.

If we each have a boxed lunch with the same sandwich, chips, a pickle, and a cookie, why would we consider trading items? Perhaps I prefer chips and you prefer cookies. Maybe I’ll give you my cookie for your chips. Now both of us are happier with our lunches. This is one example of how exchange can make people better off even without increasing the total amount of wealth. Exchange helps correct mistakes in allocation and it makes everyone involved happier. Professor Michael C. Munger offers a few examples of how exchange can make people happier whether people have the same preferences or different preferences, the same stuff to start with or different stuff. The ability to make people better off by simple exchange may seem like magic, Munger says, but it’s just markets.

via Why Do We Exchange Things? – YouTube.

Featuring Rep. Scott Garrett, Chairman of the Congressional Constitution Caucus, Chairman of the Subcommittee on Capital Markets and Government-Sponsored Enterprises, House Financial Services Committee; and Louise Bennetts, Associate Director of Financial Regulation Studies, Cato Institute; moderated by Laura Odato, Director of Government Affairs, Cato Institute.

The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 was intended to “promote the financial stability of the United States by improving accountability and transparency in the financial system, to end ‘too big to fail,’ to protect the American taxpayer by ending bailouts, to protect consumers from abusive financial services practices, and for other purposes.” The law is extraordinarily complex, requiring almost a dozen federal agencies to complete 398 rulemaking requirements, plus about 145 studies that will affect rulemaking. With the rulemaking process underway, there are growing concerns about the Act’s constitutionality. In particular, the Act has implications for the separation of powers, the role of congressional oversight, vagueness and unfettered regulator discretion, and due process. Does Dodd-Frank provide effective oversight by any branch of government, and how can constitutional concerns about the law’s grants of regulatory power be resolved?

via The Questionable Constitutionality of Dodd-Frank (U.S. Rep. Scott Garrett) – YouTube.

John Allison is the President and CEO of the Cato Institute. Prior to joining Cato, Allison was Chairman and CEO of BB&T Corporation, the 10th largest financial services holding company headquartered in the United States. During his tenure as CEO from 1989 to 2008, BB&T grew from $4.5 billion to $152 billion in assets. He was recognized by the Harvard Business Review as one of the top 100 most successful CEOs in the world over the last decade.

Allison has received the Corning Award for Distinguished Leadership, been inducted into the North Carolina Business Hall of Fame, and received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Banker. He is a former Distinguished Professor of Practice at Wake Forest University School of Business, and serves on the Board of Visitors at the business schools at Wake Forest, Duke, and UNC-Chapel Hill.

Allison is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He received his master’s degree in management from Duke University, and is also a graduate of the Stonier Graduate School of Banking.

via John A. Allison discusses Peter Wallison's Book "Bad History, Worse Policy" on C-SPAN 2's Book TV – YouTube.


Bill Whittle thinks that President Obama is trying to deliberately hurt America through the questionable sequester budget cuts. Why would the President of the United States try to punish the nation he has sworn to protect?

via PJTV: Making It Hurt – YouTube.