Archive for the ‘foundation’ Category

The US Food and Drug Administration recently unveiled nine graphic warning labels that will appear on US cigarette packs in 2012. Some of the more gruesome labels include images of diseased lungs and tracheotomy holes. According to the FDA, these labels are “the most significant advancement in communicating the dangers of smoking and the first change in cigarette warnings in more than 25 years.”

Will the graphic labels reduce smoking? Do Americans really need to be reminded that smoking isn’t good for them?

Vodpod videos no longer available.

Advertisements

Gage Gilbert seemed like a quiet child who rarely showed interest in speaking or making eye contact. His mother thought he was just a late bloomer until a Google search led her to autism. After his official diagnosis, Gage’s family tried educational software with an iPad to help their son communicate. The results were “phenomenal.” Brandi Milloy brings you the story of one family’s journey of adjusting to autism and how innovative technology helped their son develop his own voice.

To learn more about Gage’s story and how you can help other children with autism, visit the http://www.gagerufus.com

Vodpod videos no longer available.

When Dwayne Whitney started his trucking business decades ago he had only one truck. Today he has eighteen and 20 employees. But that’s about to change.

“The State of California says my trucks are killing people,” says Whitney. “What do you say to that?”

In a few years, new air quality regulations approved by the California Air Resources Board will render Whitney’s entire fleet illegal.

“New CARB rules are putting me out of business,” he says.

CARB claims that diesel particulates, a type of pollution emitted from buses and trucks, contributes to 2,000 premature deaths in California each year. But UCLA epidemiologist Dr. James Enstrom says the number should be closer to zero.

In 2005 Enstrom authored an extensive study that found no relationship between diesel particulates and premature deaths. He says his study, as well as other evidence that agrees with it, have been ignored by an agency bent on passing ever more stringent regulations regardless of their effect on California’s economy.

Enstrom blew the whistle on CARB for, among other things, failing to publicize that the lead author of the study that was used to justify the new regulations falsified his education history (he purchased his PhD from an online diploma mill).

But UCLA didn’t come to Enstrom’s defense. In fact, officials informed him that, after 34 years at the university, he was out of a job.

“The environmental regulation machine in powerful in California,” says Adam Kissel of the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, which is defending Enstrom in the fight to keep his job. “When Dr. Enstrom went up against that machine he was retaliated against.”

A hearing that begins on April 4 will determine whether Dr. Enstrom keeps his job, and the final decision rests with UCLA Chancellor Gene Block.

Says Kissel, “If Dr. Enstrom loses his job because he exercised his academic freedom, then it’s a message to other researchers that you’d better not rock the boat because you might be next.”

Vodpod videos no longer available.

This Sunday’s Academy Awards ceremony will be held in Hollywood as usual, but it’s increasingly common for Hollywood films to be produced outside California or even outside the United States.Filmmaker Joe Gressis isn’t surprised when Hollywood productions leave the Golden State. He’s surprised when they stay. “The fact that we remain here is kind of ridiculous,” says the three-time Emmy-nominated Gressis.Reason.tv’s Tim Cavanaugh sat down with Gressis, a founding partner of Secret Handshake Productions, to talk about runaway film production and the headaches of making movies in California (or anywhere else, for that matter).Topics include: tax incentives, the benefits of shooting in Hong Kong, and why Gressis admires Michael Bay.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

“Throughout the country, 90 percent of cities and states are going to go bankrupt within the next five years, many of them sooner.” So says former Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan.

Reason.tv’s Tim Cavanaugh sat down with Riordan to discuss state and local budget crises, public-sector unions, and why Riordan recently became a fan of current LA Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa.

 

On December 21, Ramiro Diaz was arrested for selling eight cans of Four Loko to an undercover agent from the Virginia Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control. Diaz faces up to a year in jail for the offense, but just a few months ago Four Loko was perfectly legal. What happened?The drink had been the subject of many media reports which suggested that Four Loko’s mixture of alcohol and caffeine causes young people to engage in risky behavior. The drink was even dubbed “Blackout in a Can,” and the story soon moved from newsrooms to Congress, where officials like Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY) demanded that it be pulled from shelves.”We must protect children from the severe and deadly consequences of drinks like Four Loko,” declared Schumer. The Food and Drug Administration agreed, and in November federal regulators banned Four Loko. The company promised to yank it from shelves by December and replace it with a decaffeinated version.So do drinks like Four Loko pose a unique danger to America’s youth or is this episode more proof that that mixing media and politics can be hazardous to your freedom?

Vodpod videos no longer available.

Reason.tv presents Great Moments in Unintended Consequences!

All actions have unanticipated side effects, but government acting through regulation or legislation is particularly adept at creating disastrous unintended consequences.

Great Moments in Unintended Consequences takes a look at three instances of epic government facepalm: Osborne Reef, Corn Ethanol Subsidies, and a particular clause in ObamaCare that is already doing more harm than good.

Vodpod videos no longer available.