Archive for the ‘freedomworks’ Category

Cal Thomas was at the DC premiere as well. Here is his review.

Twenty-nine years after her death, novelist Ayn Rand is coming to a theater near you. After many failed attempts, her 1957 novel “Atlas Shrugged” has been made into a film.

In an age when overspending, overreaching, higher-taxing and overregulating government increasingly strangles the private sector, robbing us of our liberties and transforming the country into the model of a socialist state, Rand’s story reminds us how far ahead of her time she was and just how dangerous a time we live in now.

At least one member of Congress has recognized Rand’s intuitiveness. Rep. Paul Ryan, the author of the Republican budget proposal, reportedly directed his staff to read “Atlas Shrugged” back in 2010. Ryan, writes Christopher Beam of New York magazine, even credits Rand as “the reason I got involved in public service.”

“Atlas Shrugged” is a novel, but its plot is anything but fiction. In it, successful businesswoman, Dagny Taggart, the head of one of the largest railroad companies in America, struggles to keep her company alive in challenging economic times. Searching for innovative ways to stay afloat, she teams with steel magnate Hank Rearden, the developer of an innovative metal alloy, thought to be the strongest metal in the world. Success seems assured. Then the federal government steps in. The government proclaims the Taggart-Rearden partnership “unfair” to other steel producers and passes a law regulating how many businesses an individual can own. The law is euphemistically titled the “Equalization of Opportunity” bill.

If the language and scenario sound contemporary, they should. President Obama, who plays at cutting spending and wants to raise taxes, is the embodiment of the philosophy about which Ayn Rand warned. Just how smooth Obama is at this was even noticed by the Associated Press, which tends not to think in such cynical terms when it comes to the administration. In a headline about the negotiations that supposedly led to $38 billion in spending cuts, the AP wrote: “Budget Tricks Helped Obama Save Favorite Programs From Cuts.”

“Atlas Shrugged” is about those who would penalize individual achievement and subsidize “the collective.” It is the embodiment of Karl Marx’s philosophy, “From each according to his ability, to each according to his need.” To put it another way, the collective believes that if you earn $2 dollars and I make $1 dollar, you owe me 50 cents to make things “fair.” This is redistributionist or, to paraphrase the president, “spreading the wealth around.”

I’m convinced Barney Frank IS Wesley Mouch.

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Millions of Tea Party supporters have rallied over the past two years, many have brought with them signs like those above—referencing Atlas Shrugged. As you rally on April 15th for your local Tax Day protest, I urge you to go see this important film.

The film is set in a not-so-distant future in which government has taken control of the means of production, bureaucrats have impose harmful regulations on businesses and turmoil in the Middle East has sent oil prices skyrocketing. Sound familiar?

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Atlas Is Shrugging, posted with vodpod

Downwards

Quantitative Easing II (or QEII), the pumping of $600,000,000,000 into the economy without any wealth creation, was, I think intended to get companies to spend the cash they are sitting on while they wait to see what the rules (taxes) will be before making any projections or planning how to use it. I’m quite sure that the knowledge their money will depreciate in purchasing power by 20% in the next few months will cause them to at least rethink their positions. Whether it will actually stimulate spending is less certain.

One thing is sure. It is going to infuriate anyone we owe, bondholders, those holding dollars, or that we have promised money. And as it trickles down to the general population and they notice everything is 20% higher there is going to be a lot of finger pointing going on in the political class. Hopefully it will cause that “screwy idea”/sarc of auditing the Federal Reserve to come to fruition. You do notice that the official announcement was held until after the election?

Time to review that Cloward-Piven strategy again.

Here are some links to “enjoy”/sarc:

Dollar at Risk of Crashing, Triggering Inflation

Brazil Ready to Retaliate for US Move in Currency War

U.S. dollar printing is huge risk -China

Germany Concerned About US Currency Moves

Fed bond move spurs backlash from Asia to Europe

(even though she actually is a rocket scientist) to use this ad against any incumbent. They are all guilty of perpetuating the fraudulent “borrowing” (theft is the accurate term) of the Social Security funds in order to finance the expansion of government started by that fraud Lyndon Baines Johnson.

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On occasion someone will ask what my political orientation is. This is normally after engaging in the discussion on a point that we agree on, at least in broad strokes, some other topic is raised in which my position is so diametrically opposed to theirs, that they realize I’m not what they thought.

In 1961 (I was ten) I went to live with my Grandparents in a very small town (Linden, TN) in a very rural county. Grandmother was the spitin’ image of Granny Moses (Clampett) and every bit as feisty but quite a bit more urbane. Grandfather was a tough as nails old coot you would assume was a hillbilly and he wouldn’t correct you, but you would be so very wrong.

One of the very first things my grandmother did was walk me over to the County Courthouse/City Hall (a block and a half, did I mention this as a small town?) in the basement of which was the county library. She introduced me to the librarian, who as all great librarians, had the marketing skills of a crack dealer. I’m sorry that I don’t remember her name, but I remember the first question she asked this ten year old boy. “What is your favorite book?” I told her that I had read Swiss Family Robinson several times because I liked it so much. She asked a couple of more questions to make sure I didn’t mean a comic book of the story, but the full unabridged book, and then marched straight to a bookshelf picked a book from it and said, “you’ll love this one. let’s go get you a library card.” The book was Rocket Ship Galileo. That was my introduction and the beginning of discipleship to Robert A. Heinlein.

Much later when the “social liberals” of the Republican Party gave birth to the Libertarian Party, I was right there. And I stuck with it. I worked years “herding cats” as Michael Cloud terms low level Libertarian party politics. However eight years of military experience had proven to me just how small the globe really is and how futile isolationism is as a policy. I worked on Harry Browne‘s 2000 campaign for president in Atlanta. My step-kids were the pages at his event in Atlanta, my wife (at the time) was handling the registration desk and I was doing my best imitation of a headless chicken doing the “cat herding’. My disappointment in Brown’s asinine unfortunate comments after 9/11 caused me to throw up my hands and just flat quit.

Then in April of 2005 the authors of Questions and Observations released the first of five issues of The New Libertarian. I was home again. So if I surprise you by being not what you assume, before you challenge me as inconsistent click on that link and do some reading. Hell, don’t wait, click on it anyway. I may be wrong, but the TEA Party gives me great hope that Bureaucratic Establishmentarianism is on cruise control headed for a cliff.

By the time this post disappears from the front page of this blog, the blogroll will be up and the link to The New Libertarian issues will be there.

Mr. Langone is a former director of the New York Stock Exchange and co-founder of Home Depot,and is chairman of Invemed Associates.

A little more than 30 years ago, Bernie Marcus, Arthur Blank, Pat Farrah and I got together and founded The Home Depot. Our dream was to create (memo to DNC activists: that’s build, not take or coerce) a new kind of home-improvement center catering to do-it-yourselfers. The concept was to have a wide assortment, a high level of service, and the lowest pricing possible.

We opened the front door in 1979, also a time of severe economic slowdown. Yet today, Home Depot is staffed by more than 325,000 dedicated, well-trained, and highly motivated people offering outstanding service and knowledge to millions of consumers.

If we tried to start Home Depot today, under the kind of onerous regulatory controls that you have advocated, it’s a stone cold certainty that our business would never get off the ground, much less thrive. Rules against providing stock options would have prevented us from incentivizing worthy employees in the start-up phase—never mind the incredibly high cost of regulatory compliance overall and mandatory health insurance. Still worse are the ever-rapacious trial lawyers.


Click here to read the rest.

Voter Fraud is a destroying the election process and why True the Vote is committed to fighting it.

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