Archive for the ‘governor scott walker’ Category

Democratic Assemblyman Gordon Hintz pointed and exploded at female Conservative Michelle Litjens saying, “you’re dead” … there was also an f-bomb in there somewhere. She was completely taken off guard and continues to tell Bill Hemmer how, “She was shaken up.” For more, log onto http://www.foxnewsinsider.com.

Wisconsin. Ohio. Michigan. New Jersey. New York. Budget-battle showdowns are coming soon to a statehouse near you.

Thousands of angry school teachers, union members, and their sympathizers have descended on capitals to fight against reducing pay and benefits for public employees. The protesters are up against a new crop of governors who are hell-bent on spending cuts to deal with deficits that may rise to combined $125 billion in the next fiscal year.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D-N.Y.) is looking for public employees to pay $500 million towards benefits they’re currently receiving for free.

New Jersey’s Chris Christie is proposing public employees pick up 30 percent of their health care premiums. Wisconsin’s Scott Walker wants public employees to pay at least 13 percent of their health care premiums. And he wants state workers to start contributing to their retirements for the first time.

This new found fiscal discipline comes after a virtually unchecked binge over the past 10 years during which state expenditures exploded by more than 80 percent in inflation-adjusted dollars, including big bumps in overall worker compensation.

The most controversial aspect of the budget battles deals with public-sector unions and collective bargaining. Wisconsin’s Walker and others argue that the current process is inherently stacked against taxpayers because the government isn’t spending its own money like companies in the private sector do. What’s more, taxpayers have no way of opting out of any agreement that’s reached. In the private sector, consumers can always take their business elsewhere. That’s the basic reason why progressives such as Franklin Roosevelt and labor legend George Meany were against unions for government workers.

In a world of super-tight budgets, it’s a foregone conclusion that public-sector workers are going to have to give back compensation. Public school teachers make up the bulk of government employees in every state in the country and they already make 35 percent more in straight salary than their private-school counterparts. There’s also a growing gap between what they get toward retirement and what private-sector professionals receive.

Teacher union leaders in Wisconsin and elsewhere now say that educators are willing to accept less compensation – just as long as nobody cuts the union out of the deal-making. Whatever the fate of public employee unions in this, the winter of our discontent, there’s no question that teachers and other state workers are going to have to get used to making less.

That’s not a total fix, much less a revolution, but it counts as real progress in a country where every state government has spent itself to the brink of bankruptcy.

There is a need to muzzle the public sector unions. They take a share of the taxpayer funds allocated to pay for public services, and then use a large part of those funds to elect the people they are supposed to “bargain with” in order o receive more of the taxpayers money. The best solution would be a federal “right to work” law that would make joining and paying dues to a union totally optional with none of that “agency fee” nonsense. Or for that matter stringent by the NRLB of the “Beck rights” found in the landmark decision Communication Workers v. Beck. Of course Obummer has appointed a guy to head the NLRB that doesn’t even believe. in the right to secret ballot, he wants his gooion friends thugs to know who voted against them. For “appropriate” reeducation no doubt.

There was a time when public service was considered a noble but lower paid calling. While benefits in the public sector were always good, public servants historically could expect to trade some level of wages in exchange for job stability. No more. Today, public sector union workers earn more than their private sector counterparts, they have far more job stability, and their benefits and pensions far outshine the average in the private sector. Looking specifically at Wisconsin, for instance, the “average Milwaukee Public School teacher will be receiving $100,005 in compensation this year – $56,500 of that is in salary, and a whopping $43,505 is in benefits.” Note that a teacher’s salary only covers a little over 9 months of employment. When adjusted for that, “teachers are among some of the most highly compensated employees in the state.” And as far as quality for the tax payer dollars spent, it is notable that, according to Juan Williams on Fox News Sunday today, the reading test scores for black children in Milwaukee are the lowest in the country.