Archive for the ‘monetary policy’ Category

The Progressive Nightmare & The Conservative Solution

Posted: August 20, 2011 in 2012, 2nd amendment, 4th Amendment, academics, administration, agenda, agents, airport, arguing with idiots, audit the Fed, austrian, bankrupting america, banning american flag, Barack Obama, Barney Frank, bearded marxist, bernanke, Bernie Madow, Big Ed, big government, bondholder ripoff, Border Patrol, broke usa, budget, busybodies, cap and tax, carbon trading, climaquiddick, climategate, Cloward Pivens, congress, conservatism, conservative, conservatives, constitution, corruption, currency devaluations, DEA, debt, decision points, declaration of independence, deficit, deficits, democrat, democratic, democrats, dhimmicretins, Drug War, easing, east anglia, economic, economic liberty, economics, economy, education reform, election, elite, elitism, elitist, employment, entitlement, environmentalism, ethnic, euro, european monetary union, F. A. Hayek, federal healthcare, federal reserve, federalist papers, firearms, freedom, friedman, general electric, gerrymandering, global warming, government motors, government spending, guantitative easing, gun control, Herman Cain, homeland security, idiots, illegal immigration, international debt, international economics, international monetary fund, ipcc, job killer, John Keynes, JournoList, justice department, justice fraud, Lame-Stream Media, left, leftist, liberal, liberal gene, liberals, libertarian, libertarianism, liberty, lies, looters, Media Malpractice, Michelle Bachmann, Mitt Romney, monetary policy, moochers, nanny state, napolitano, natural law, Neo-Libertarian, Newt Gingrich, Obama, Politically incorrect, propaganda, rational basis test, reason, Rick Santorum, Ron Paul, Sarah Palin, Tim Pawlenty, weapons, Wesley Mouch, Zimbabwe School of Economics

The Progressive Nightmare

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The Conservative Solution

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Is the American Dream dead? How free is America’s economy? Check out the 2011 Index of Economic Freedom for all the answers.

http://www.heritage.org/index

 

What did central bankers have to know and then be empowered to do in order to have avoided the housing bubble and economic fallout? Adam Posen is an External Member of the Monetary Policy Committee for the Bank of England, and a Senior Fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics. He spoke at the Cato Institute’s Monetary Conference held in November 2010.

The problem with his analysis is that he doesn’t differentiate between periods of healthy growth vs. periods of inflation (or other government policy) driven growth. That’s why he says not all booms are followed by busts. But it’s fairly easy to spot inflation-driven growth, so it’s also fairly easy to spot bubbles, despite what he thinks.

See my previous post on Monetary Policy, Housing and Other Bubbles and get the free book shown there.

Adam Posen Discusses Asset Bubbles, posted with vodpod

 

 

Using only a big piece of pork, a large knife, and a small knife, the budget chef shows how to balance the federal budget by 2020.

As a special treat, he does it without raising taxes from the current Bush-era rates!It seems like a complicated preparation at first, but it’s so simple that almost any elected official should be able to pull it off like a pro!

Domestic and foreign investors will love this, and it will also help create a stable environment conducive to long-term, sustainable economic growth.Between 2011 and 2020, the Congressional Budget Office estimates that total federal outlays – for defense, agriculture subsidies, Medicare, Social Security, you name it – will total a whopping $42.1 trillion (in 2010 dollars). To bring outlays down to revenue, we need to cut a total of $1.3 trillion in total expenditures over the next 10 years.

That sounds like a really tall order until you realize that it cutting just 3.6 percent a year for each of the next 10 years. To put it in dollar terms, it means cutting about $130 billion a year from budgets that will average over $4 trillion. That’s not so hard now, is it? By making small, systematic cuts to a federal budget that is larded up with more fat than an Ponderosa buffet, we can balance the budget without even nicking essential services.

This video is based on “How to Balance the Budget Without Raising Taxes,” by Nick Gillespie and Reason economics columnist Veronique de Rugy of the Mercatus Center. Read that December 5, 2010 piece for detailed breakdowns of spending amounts: http://reason.com/archives/2010/12/05/how-to-balance-the-budget-with

 

Monetary policy can cause markets to misallocate resources. That simple insight has profound implications for how financial markets should function. Cato Institute senior fellow Gerald P. O’Driscoll Jr. discussed asset prices and bubbles at the Cato Institute’s Monetary Conference in November 2010.

After watching the video, you may wish to know more about how monetary causes bubbles. Click on the link below the book cover shown below and you will be taken to a page if the Ludwig von Mises Institute where you will find links to buy a hard copy, or download a free electronic copy of the book this book examines the monetary interventions that engendered not only the Mississippi Bubble, the South Sea Bubble and Tulipmania was as well and shows that they were caused by government meddling.

Tulipmania was unique in that it was the sound money policy of the Dutch combined with free coinage laws that led to an acute increase in the supply of money and fostered an atmosphere that was ripe for speculation and malinvestment, manifesting itself in the intense trading of tulip bulbs.

Buy or download a free copy of this book.

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Tracing the causes of the financial crisis would inevitably lead to monetary policy, but Carmen Reinhart argues that the effect of monetary policy on the financial crisis is overstated. Reinhart is coauthor of the book This Time Is Different. She spoke at the Cato Institute’s monetary conference in November, 2010.

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The Story of Business: http://bankruptingamerica.org(sponsored by Public Notice and the Small Business and Entrepreneurship Council)
“I risk my livelihood…I don’t know what greater risk I could be taking,” says Wes Garner, owner of Great Lakes Calcium, a small business in Green Bay, Wisconsin that makes the compound in Tums.

Wes is an entrepreneur, and he’s invested his life into his business. He does it because he loves to create, innovate, and provide the foundation for himself and his employees to make a good living. But Wes is worried. Uncertainty is one of the most damaging hurdles a business can face. And Wes doesn’t understand why government is making things unnecessarily uncertain and complex for his business.

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