Archive for the ‘teacher’s union’ Category

I don’t think there is anything left to say, except to remind you, “Your tax dollars at Work!”

Maybe Matthew 7:16 “By Their Works Ye Shall Know Them”

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Teachers Union Leader calls for revolution, wants to learn from socialists, says being Republican is a pathology, and evil.

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When the auto assembly line model was brought into American public schools, it was an achievement of efficiency, but it has now produced its consequences. Organized labor, too, has made its mark in creating a one-size-fits-all way for treating and compensating teachers.

http://www.kidsarentcars.com

verywhere you turn these days, your public sector unions are hard at work, protesting cutbacks to public sector unions. Andrew Klavan exposes the charming charm of your unionized civil servants.

Faced with an $8 billion budget deficit, Ohio Gov. John Kasich (R) is on the verge of signing a bill that would prevent state employees from using collective bargaining to negotiate their health and pension benefits. Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (R) has pushed a similar bill, which has drawn national attention, spawned weeks of protests, and sent Democratic lawmakers fleeing the state as a way to stall its passage.

Two other GOP governors facing major budget crises – New Jersey’s Chris Christie and Michigan’s Rick Snyder – have made it clear that they don’t see restricting bargaining rights as the key to more austerity. Texas, North Carolina, and Louisiana face major budget deficits, and in those states public employees don’t have collective bargaining rights.

To what extent is collective bargaining to blame for out-of-control state spending? Is clamping down on the ability of public-employee unions to negotiate an important tactic for closing what may grow to a combined $125 billion gap in state budgets next fiscal year?

I can’t understand how Trade Unions and others like the Mine Workers can stand with government unions. I have sent much of my like in “Right to Work” states and have specifically requested trade union sub-contractors for building projects because I have watched unions like the IBEW train, certify and produce exceptional tradesmen ofttimes working with less than “prime” candidates. To me someone who has gone through a trade union’s training is much preferred over someone simply “licensed” by government. The mining, seafaring and manufacturing unions whose primary objectives are the safety and just treatment of their members are also good organizations. This i not to say I believe in union protectionism. I believe that unions should have to sell their product to the members and their worth to their consumers. “Look for the union label” used to mean higher quality, and it still should.

Government unions (and now the UAW with their cozy relationship and funding running back and forth with corrupticrat politicians) are the ones that draw my ire and the following video sums it up in a nutshell. The Government Unions have become the way to make the taxpayer fund big government politicians at the expense of the taxpayers.

Last year, parents of students in failing California public schools were given a reason to be hopeful when Sacramento politicians passed something called the “parent trigger” law. The way the law works is that if 51% of parents at a failing school sign a petition, they can turn the school into a charter school, replace the staff or simply use the petition as a bargaining chip to initiate a conversation about change.

On December 7, 2010, with help from the non-profit group Parent Revolution, parents of children attending McKinley Elementary in Compton became the first group of parents to pull the parent trigger. Their dream was to transform the school into a Celerity charter school. Instead, the Compton parents were thrust into a prolonged fight with supporters of the status quo: the Compton Unified School District, the teachers’ unions, Gov. Jerry Brown and Tom Torlakson, the newly elected Superintendent of Public Instruction.

This is the story about a group of parents in Compton who are fighting to give their children a better education.