Archive for the ‘union’ Category

I remember my grade school principal walking into our class and telling us that the school was closing for the day and for us to prepare to board our schoolbusses. I was distressed to find, when I got home that the President had been killed. I did not know until adulthood that in 1962, President John Kennedy issued Executive Order 10988, affirming the right of federal workers to organize and codifying their right to bargain collectively. Thus JFK was the culprit that laid the groundwork for the plague of locusts referred to as “Public Sector Unions”.  (Or as the Democrats call them, “Moneybags”.

The unions are resisting fiscal reforms, even though they are picking the pockets of private sector workers. Are salaries and benefits a right? Steve Green reminds PJTV viewers that rights belong to the individual, not the collective. Hear more about the future of labor, public service unions, and the Wisconsin protests on this episode of Trifecta.

▶ Money Grubbing Thugs: Public Sector Unions Can’t Stop Devouring Taxpayer Money – YouTube.

And from the Seattle Times another union paradigm for collaboration with the National Socialists:

It’s obvious that if some foreign entity were to conspire to dumb down our children as today’s teachers union is doing (the NEA), it would be an act of war. So why do these teacher union thugs get a pass from our wrath?

As our modern-day government run school system pumps out raving failures year after year, public apathy seems to keep pace with the same ignorance fostered by government school incompetence.

This new NEA SS guard is taking over the public schools, and are opting to teach our children the rudiments of their faulty strain of collectivism which has as its goal “equal outcome” (a.k.a. outcome-based education) as opposed to equal opportunity.

Instead of teaching reading, writing and arithmetic, these incompetent NEA-trained teachers are instead teaching our kids how to install a latex condom onto a banana.

While laying claim to a “values neutral” school system, they are indoctrinating our children with various strains of humanistic thinking, as well as incorporating ancient pagan beliefs about nature.

Teacher’s Union — Schools Are Training Idiots To Become Drain On Our Society

It isn’t funny how we keep having to fidht the same battles. But this time they’ve had our educational system and media in their grip for oveer forty years and have redifined our words (remember when discriminating was a synonym for discerning?)and have denigrated even the concept of critical thinking. The TEA Party movement wasn’t anticipated and may save us from the hucksters of statism and socialism.

Anybody else remembering Margaret Thatcher’s prediction, “The problem with socialism is that eventually you run out of other people’s money”

London riots, anyone?

Vodpod videos no longer available.

Presented by Yuri Maltsev at the Mises Circle in Chicago: “Strategies for Changing Minds Toward Liberty,” on 9 April 2011. Sponsored by Dr. Don Stacy.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

From National Review:

But status quo and stagnation are not an appealing platform, especially for one who campaigned as the candidate of hope and change. Democrats are playing defense, hoping for a shift of opinion. So far, it hasn’t happened.

The public-employee unions hoped to defeat a Republican Supreme Court justice and create an activist liberal majority that might overturn the law. Turnout increased from 793,000 in April 2009 to 837,000 in the February 2011 primary to 1,494,000 last week, and examination of the returns shows big increases where unions are strong.

Maybe the taxpayers are tired of being enslaved by the tax-eaters? If not, oh well Heinlein (for those of you that don’t “get” Who is John Galt?) explained it this way:

“Throughout history, poverty is the normal condition of man. Advances which permit this norm to be exceeded — here and there, now and then — are the work of an extremely small minority, frequently despised, often condemned, and almost always opposed by all right-thinking people. Whenever this tiny minority is kept from creating, or (as sometimes happens) is driven out of a society, the people then slip back into abject poverty.

This is known as “bad luck.”
— Robert Heinlein

I have been wondering about the seemingly incoherent policies propagating out of the District of Corruption and trying to develop a model of thinking and goals that would be consistent with the insanity. I have had to abandon any thought of citizen or taxpayer well-being or maintenance of American exceptionalism in order to come up with a somewhat consistent model.

The District of Corruption has become, in essence, a wholesale club sized Faculty Lounge that has developed a plan to run the country as a university focused on the welfare of the faculty over the students or the payers of the tuition.

First is the plan to get out of debt seems to be Quantitative Easing III, IV, V, VI, and however many more it takes to make all those outstanding Treasury Bills (and their interest obligations) worthless. The fact that it will impoverish the American citizenry is as Microsoft used to say, “not a bug, but a feature.” It will wipe out the rich as well as the successful and the thrifty, thus putting all citizens’ welfare in the hands of those best qualified to judge a persons worth (no not the free market, that is seen as cruel, unfair and idiotic to the insufficiently rewarded, it must be those with the wisdom of Solomon, the Tenured).

This destruction of the dollar not only gets us out of debt while punishing those so rude to have been more successful in the free market than the new masters, but also sets the stage for the resurgence of America as a “properly structured society.” In other words the serfs need to acknowledge their proper place in the presence of their accredited and credentialed betters.

That brings us to the master stroke. In claiming that the oil companies get a “tax incentive” by writing off business expenses such as depreciation, exploration, and the cost of failed production attempts (things that legitimate costs of doing business in every other business, just bigger numbers in the oil business), the stage is set for the DOE to revoke all leases and nationalize the oil fields. After the dollar has been destroyed and whether the new currency that purchases oil is a “basket of currencies” or the PetroBuck® the wealth in the oil fields of what was previously called the United States will be more than enough to support the proletariat in their virtual slavery while the masters party like Nero. Issuing decrees as the Gods from Olympus (you have to “properly guide” those serfs, dontcha know?).

I’ve been told for my entire life that public-school teachers are underpaid. Even if that was true at one time, is it true any longer?

Public school teachers are at the forefront of protests against state budget cuts and restrictions on collective bargaining rights in Wisconsin, New Jersey, Ohio, and elsewhere.

Teachers have a lot to lose. According to Department of Education statistics, in 2007-2008 (the latest year available), full-time public school teachers across the country made an average of $53,230 in “total school-year and summer earned income.” That compares favorably to the $39,690 that private school teachers pulled down.

And when it comes to retirement benefits, public school teachers do better than average too. According to EducationNext, government employer contribute the equivalent of 14.6 percent of salary to retirement benefits for public school teachers. That compares to 10.4 for private-sector professionals.

Those levels of compensation help explain why per-pupil school costs have risen substantially over the past 50 years. In 1960-61, public schools spent $2,769 per student, a figure that now totals over $10,000 in real, inflation-adjusted dollars. Among the things that threefold-plus increase in spending has purchased are more teachers per student. In 1960, the student-teacher ratio in public schools was 25.8; it’s now at a historic low of 15.

Among the things all that money hasn’t bought? Parental satisfaction, for one. Despite public teachers’ much-higher salaries, parents with school-age children in public schools report substantially lower satisfaction rates than parents with children in private schools. In 2007, the percentage of parents with children in assigned public schools who were “very satisfied” with the institution was 52 percent. For parents whose children attended public schools of choice, that figure rose to 62 percent. Parents sending their children to private schools, whether religious or non-sectarian, were “very satisfied” 79 percent of the time.

It’s little wonder that parents with little or no choice report the lowest-levels of satisfaction (about 90 percent of K-12 students attend public schools). Despite all the extra resources devoted to public school teachers and students, student achievement has been absolutely flat over the past 40 years. The National Assessment of Educational Progress is “the largest nationally representative and continuing assessment of what America’s students know and can do in various subject areas.” When it comes to 17-year-old students (effectively, high-school seniors), nothing has changed since reporting began in the early 1970s. In 1971, 17-year-old students averaged 285 points (out of 500) in reading. In 2008, that had risen to 286. For math in 1973, the average score was 304 (out of 500). In 2008, it was 306.

Public school teachers make about $14,000 a year more in straight salary than private school teachers; when you add in benefits, the gap widens even more. They teach fewer students than ever before and taxpayers at all levels spend increasing amounts of money on education. Yet for all that, the best you can say is that we’re spending more than three times as much money as we were 40 years ago for exactly the same outcomes.

The National Governors Association says that states are looking at $175 billion in shortfalls over the next two years. Local governments are in the red too. As legislators look for places to cut or reduce spending, there’s no question that public school teachers have a lot to lose in terms of compensation.

And there’s no question that, even if there were no budget emergencies, the nation’s public school system is failing to return much of anything on an ever-growing pile of tax dollars.

Reason looks at the facts and intersperses the data with some now-familiar scenes of teacher protests, set to a particularly apt piece of music.

Wisconsin. Ohio. Michigan. New Jersey. New York. Budget-battle showdowns are coming soon to a statehouse near you.

Thousands of angry school teachers, union members, and their sympathizers have descended on capitals to fight against reducing pay and benefits for public employees. The protesters are up against a new crop of governors who are hell-bent on spending cuts to deal with deficits that may rise to combined $125 billion in the next fiscal year.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D-N.Y.) is looking for public employees to pay $500 million towards benefits they’re currently receiving for free.

New Jersey’s Chris Christie is proposing public employees pick up 30 percent of their health care premiums. Wisconsin’s Scott Walker wants public employees to pay at least 13 percent of their health care premiums. And he wants state workers to start contributing to their retirements for the first time.

This new found fiscal discipline comes after a virtually unchecked binge over the past 10 years during which state expenditures exploded by more than 80 percent in inflation-adjusted dollars, including big bumps in overall worker compensation.

The most controversial aspect of the budget battles deals with public-sector unions and collective bargaining. Wisconsin’s Walker and others argue that the current process is inherently stacked against taxpayers because the government isn’t spending its own money like companies in the private sector do. What’s more, taxpayers have no way of opting out of any agreement that’s reached. In the private sector, consumers can always take their business elsewhere. That’s the basic reason why progressives such as Franklin Roosevelt and labor legend George Meany were against unions for government workers.

In a world of super-tight budgets, it’s a foregone conclusion that public-sector workers are going to have to give back compensation. Public school teachers make up the bulk of government employees in every state in the country and they already make 35 percent more in straight salary than their private-school counterparts. There’s also a growing gap between what they get toward retirement and what private-sector professionals receive.

Teacher union leaders in Wisconsin and elsewhere now say that educators are willing to accept less compensation – just as long as nobody cuts the union out of the deal-making. Whatever the fate of public employee unions in this, the winter of our discontent, there’s no question that teachers and other state workers are going to have to get used to making less.

That’s not a total fix, much less a revolution, but it counts as real progress in a country where every state government has spent itself to the brink of bankruptcy.